Window Tint Regulations in California

When you spend as much time in your car as many Californians do, it’s important to make sure that you are comfortable and safe while you’re on the road. If you do not have car window tint in Sunnyvale, now is the time to outfit your vehicle to give your eyes a rest from annoying glare and brightness. For drivers who already have tinted windows, it is important to understand what the regulations in California are regarding darkness and reflectiveness. Keep reading to learn about the window tint regulations in California. window - tinting

Darkness

Window tints are measured based on visible light transmission, or VLT, which refers to what percentage of light is allowed through your windows. If you are driving a sedan, van, or SUV, you can have a non-reflective tint on the uppermost 4 inches of your windshield to minimize brightness from the sun. The windows in the front have to let at least 70% of light in, but the back and rear windows can be tinted as light or as dark as you want. If your front windows are tinted too dark, you should consider window tint removal to make sure your car is in compliance with the regulations. In California, it is not permitted to use amber, red, or blue tints anywhere on your car’s windows.

Tint Reflection

The darkness of the tint is not the only thing that is regulated in California. The reflectiveness of car window tint will also play a role in how much light and heat get into your car. For the front and back side windows on your car, van, or SUV, the tint should be only as reflective as a standard window. Window tints that have a higher reflectivity are not permitted under California law. You may have to remove your tint if it is too reflective, or does not otherwise match the regulations of your state. Remember that these laws are subject to interpretation in your county, so be sure to check with your window tinting shop to make sure you are obeying the law.